Trevor Ford

Born in Swansea in 1923, Trevor Ford found fame in the last years of the Second World War with his home-town club, before moving to Aston Villa in 1947. He was a centre forward in the classic style - hard and uncompromising but totally fair. His shoulder-charging of goalkeepers - legal in football in those days - was one of the highlights of any match that he played in. Wales legend John Charles paid this tribute to him: "I used to watch him when I was a young lad - he was my idol. He used to bang everybody and knock them out of the way, he was never frightened."
 
After his international debut in 1946, Ford went on to score a record-breaking 23 goals in 38 games for Wales, the most memorable being a back-heeled flick against England at Wembley in 1952. In total, he scored some 174 league goals in 349 appearances, including a record 41 strikes for Swansea in the 1945-46 season. Ford became the most expensive forward in Britain in 1950 when Sunderland paid Villa 30,000 for him. Ford had been the first Villa player of note to speak openly about dissatisfaction with the lack of achievement at Villa Park, and he left Villa for that reason. However, he failed to gain any major medals at Sunderland.

But the most controversial period of his career came in 1956 when he was suspended by the Football League after an investigation into illegal payments brought to light in his book 'I Lead the Attack'. He eventually fought and won his case for reinstatement and, after successful spells with Cardiff City (where he played with Gerry Hitchens for a while) and PSV Eindhoven, he finished his league career with Newport County in 1960. He died in 2002.
 

Season

League

FA Cup

FL Cup

Europe

 

Games

Goals

Games

Goals

Games

Goals

Games

Goals

1946-47

9

9

0

0

 

 

 

 

1947-48

35

18

1

0

 

 

 

 

1948-49

31

13

4

1

 

 

 

 

1949-50

36

18

3

0

 

 

 

 

1950-51

9

2

0

0